Tag: broken

Replacing A Broken Tile

You will want to replace broken or cracked tiles to maintain the appearance of a room. It is also important to replace them because damaged tiles can lead to leaks in the room, which can damage walls and floors, and may lead to mold problems and eventually structural damage.Use a grout raker to remove the grout from around the edge of the broken tile. Check for electricity or water supplies using a detector. Weaken the tile surface further by drilling a number of holes through it. Use a club hammer and chisel to remove sections of the broken tile. Be sure to wear gloves and protective goggles. Apply tile adhesive to the back of a tile using an adhesive spreader. Position the tile, checking that it sits flush. Use spacers to maintain grout gaps. When dry, remove the spacers and grout the joints.

Reusing Broken Tiles

Before you dispose of the pieces of tile from your repair job, consider a few other options. Broken tile can be used for decorative mosaic elements in your home. Mosaic patterns can enhance flower pots, picture frames, and be used as part of a unique flooring design. If you are planning to have potted plants, broken tiles can be used as a bottom layer in the pot to help with drainage. http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/skills-and-know-how/masonry-and-tiling/how-to-fix-broken-wall-tile-and-how-to-regrout

Broken Tile

Set the New Tile

Comb a small amount of thinset mortar over the substrate in straight furrows using a one-fourth inch notched trowel. For best adhesion, also butter the back of the new tile with thinset. Set the tile in place and press down firmly to level it with the surrounding tile. Adjust it so the spacing is even on all sides. http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/step/0,,20051584_869330,00.html

Whether you are a novice or a professional, attempting to remove and replace a wall or floor tile with a new one is always difficult. Even the experienced tradesman will not succeed on every occasion so to these ends this guide will show you how to remove wall tiles and also give you tips on removing floor tiles. http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/replace-tile.htm

Fitting The New Tile

Dust out the hole and apply a thin layer of tile adhesive, with either a scraper or an adhesive spreader, to the back of the tile before pressing it in place.

Position spacers (or thick cardboard that will maintain the same gap between the tiles) in the joints to prevent the tile from slipping out of position while the adhesive dries – this is a must for wall tiles but not vital if replacing a floor tile. http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2010/jan/18/fix-a-broken-tile